Linda McMahon, the SBA Focused on Educating Young Entrepreneurs

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Although many of President Donald Trump’s cabinet and staff picks have been met with a mixed amount of resistance from Senate Democrats, his pick for the head of the Small Business Administration (SBA), Linda McMahon, proved to be an effective choice. After her successful 81-19 vote for confirmation, the former President and CEO of World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) McMahon laid out several goals she seeks to accomplish in her role as SBA administrator. Among them is educating young entrepreneurs about money management and helping small businesses feel safer taking on the risks associated with expansion and hiring new employees.

“Job growth is a pillar of my campaign,” McMahon said during her confirmation hearing. The new SBA administrator noted that she has also met “kids in high school who don’t know how to balance a checkbook.” McMahon also explained that she wants to help educate young entrepreneurs to enter into business with more knowledge as a way to help prevent new businesses from failing. “I wanted to share my vast experience with others who are launching start-ups or looking to scale their businesses,” McMahon explained. She continued, “Through live events and webinars, we educate entrepreneurs about things like applying for a loan and developing a business plan.”

It is quite likely the new SBA administrator intends to include insurance acquisition as part of her educational goals for young entrepreneurs. Start-up companies headed by young entrepreneurs fail for a large number of reasons, some of which could be avoided by risk mitigation or certain types of insurance. A large number of businesses, such as new restaurants, service-based companies, and technology companies, can benefit from a few core insurance policies that cover a wide set of concerns. A Business Owners Policy, for example, will help protect many young businesses against property damage or loss, third party bodily injury, or customer complaints or lawsuits that could quickly eat into the limited resources of a new company.

As McMahon begins her role as head of the SBA, small business owners and young entrepreneurs will see how McMahon intends to realize the ideas she expressed to help small businesses survive in a tough market. As McMahon stated in her Senate confirmation hearing, part of her goal is to help small businesses learn how to survive. “Under-capitalization is the reason a lot of small companies fail,” McMahon said. “Having walked in those shoes, I absolutely understand that.”

 

NFIB Finds Small Businesses Optimistic, Planning Expansion

Small Business Optimism

In its January 2017 Index of Small Business Optimism, the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) discovered that small business owners are more optimistic than they’ve been in over a decade. This optimism comes alongside early signs of a bullish stock market and wage growth entering into the new year.

NFIB’s monthly jobs report also discovered that this higher optimism going into the new year is coupled by hiring. With 18% of small business owners reporting that they were planning to increase their employment, trends point toward growth for small businesses, and new opportunities for recent college graduates and job changers. Furthermore, 25% of businesses consider it a good time to expand. NFIB notes that this current economic recovery is reminiscent of the 1983 recovery, which, NFIB explains “was followed by years of economic prosperity”.

As SMBs look to growing their businesses, many may begin to consider how to cover the newly hired employees. Depending on the industry, businesses may need to consider purchasing Workers Compensation for their employees. In most states, businesses are required to purchase Workers Compensation after meeting a certain employee threshold. In some states, that threshold is fairly low. Arkansas, for example, requires most businesses with as few as 3 employees to purchase this type of insurance to cover their employees.

Meanwhile, expansion for some businesses may mean acquiring new property. Depending on the type of business, this might mean expanding current Commercial Property and General Liability policies. In some cases, businesses seeking to expand may benefit by rolling both policies together into a Business Owners Policy, which can provide a simpler solution to purchasing the Commercial Property or General Liability policies separately.

Although NFIB found some negative trends, such as a slight decrease in plans for capital outlays, NFIB President and CEO Juanita Duggan explained that growth trend will likely continue. “Now they can see relief on the horizon,” she said, “and they are much more optimistic about the future.”

 

What’s the Difference Between my General Liability Policy and Certificate of Insurance?

General Liability insurance protects your business from third-party claims of injury and property damage. In many industries, a certificate of insurance (COI) is commonly required by a client before work on a project or new business deal can begin. COIs are common in industries where work is regularly contracted out.

A COI is a one-page document that includes the details of your insurance policy, including coverage limits, a policy number, effective dates, the name of your company, and the name of the insurance company issuing the policy. It basically serves as a verification that you have the insurance you say you do, but in a much more concise manner than the actually policy document. COIs can be issued for a variety of policies such as umbrella insurance and workers compensation insurance, depending on your industry and the job at hand.

Holiday Party Planning & Insurance: Key Risks

Holidays

It’s that time of year again: holiday party season. Holiday parties offer coworkers the opportunity to socialize, network, and celebrate the year’s accomplishments. While there’s nothing wrong with having fun, companies should be aware that there are a number of very serious risks surrounding company parties and events.

SlipShare Q&A: Customer Insurance Journeys

Client Q&A With Homer Logistics

Hearing and sharing customer stories is an important part of what we do at CoverWallet. It helps us be our best, and highlights why continue innovating to make it simple for small business owners to manage their insurance.

We also think it’s important for entrepreneurs to get a better understanding of the insurance difficulties other business have faced, and how these challenges were overcome.

When we met Paul Norton, founder of SlipShare, we knew we needed to share and tell his story. He was gracious enough to sit down with us and walk us through his journey.

CoverWallet Raises $7.8 Million, Adds Jim Ermilio as President of Insurance

CoverWallet is excited to announce today that we’ve receive $7.8 million in funding in a Series A round led by Union Square Ventures. To date, we’ve raised $9.5 million.

In addition to Union Square Ventures, Index Ventures and previous investors Highland Capital Partners, Two Sigma Ventures, and Founder Collective participated in the Series A round. We’re also welcoming John Buttrick of Union Square Ventures to the board, who has previously led investments in startups reinventing financial services industries, such as Lending Club, SigFig, and RealtyShares.

D&O and Other Management Liability Risks for Non-Profits

Non-Profits + InsuranceNon-profit organizations are a major sector in the business community. There are more than 1.5 million such organizations in the U.S., and the sector accounts for almost 10 percent of all salaries and wages paid in the country, according to The Nonprofit Almanac.

Non-profits face a number of unique legal and financial risks. For example, many non-profits depend on volunteers to carry out their work. But traditional business insurance policies typically only cover paid employees, leaving a coverage gap that must be addressed.

These unique risks have led to a number of policies that are specialized for the non-profit sector. Unfortunately, many organizations still don’t understand the risks they face and the best way to mitigate them.

Coffee Shops: Key Risks & Insurance Tips

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Few business ventures are more rewarding than a well-run restaurant or coffee shop. The development from hopeful idea to fully-fleshed reality rests on the your ability to please customers while working long hours to grow your brand. For restaurant owners, there’s little more satisfying than to have your brand both recognized and appreciated in your community. Yet that kind of success takes hard work and an extensive amount of management to get there. From hiring and managing employees to staying abreast of food shipments, expiration dates, important purchases, marketing, and regularly updated menu items, restaurant and coffee shop owners must constantly juggle a seemingly impossible number of important tasks. At the heart of all of these, however, is the struggle to mitigate the risks involved, making insurance a necessary part of doing business.

Three Risks Small Businesses Often Forget About

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It should come as no surprise that insurance is necessary to run a successful business. However, many businesses, especially smaller businesses and those just starting out aren’t getting proper coverage because of the cost.

That’s right, depending on your industry, and the risks that come with it, insurance may come with a big price tag. What many of these businesses are failing to realize is that while insurance may be pricey, it also will save you should something go terribly wrong within your business.

More often than not, business owners will put their business at risk, without even realizing it, because they are too optimistic to realize how at risk they really are. So, If you’ve found yourself saying, “yeah yeah, it’ll never happen to me” you better check yourself before you wreck your business.

To make your life easier, we’ve rounded up some of the most common mistakes small business owners make when it comes to assessing risk and getting the right insurance so that you won’t make the same mistakes.

CoverWallet Named One of the “Best Entrepreneurial Companies in America” by Entrepreneur Magazine

Entrepreneur

Awesome news: CoverWallet was named as one of the “Best Entrepreneurial Companies in America” by Entrepreneur Magazine! That’s right, we’re on this year’s Entrepreneur 360™ List.

Honorees were identified based on the results from a comprehensive study of independently-owned companies, using a proprietary algorithm and other advanced analytics. The algorithm was built on a balanced scorecard designed to measure four metrics reflecting major pillars of entrepreneurship — Innovation, Growth, Leadership and Impact.

Our team has spent tireless hours building an industry changing product and this award is proof that we’re on the right track. We’re so proud of what we have been able to create so far and are incredibly honored to be among the chosen honorees on this year’s Entrepreneur 360™ list.

There are many other companies that have made this year’s list, too. To check out it out head on over here.